The Dust Overlooked

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Household dust is a mix of many things: plant pollen, pet dander, insect waste, carpet and clothing fibers, dirt, bacteria, fungi, and, yes, even a few dead human skin cells (though not as many as some might have you believe!). An abundance of the stuff not only makes your home look drab, but also traps odors, and can pose grave health risks for people with allergies, asthma, or other respiratory illnesses.

MaidPro’s 49-Point Checklist™—which all our cleaning PROs use to guide their work—takes a thorough approach to busting household dust. On each clean, we task our PROs with addressing:

  • Baseboards
  • Windowsills
  • Floors
  • Lamps/lampshades
  • Picture frames
  • Ceiling fans
  • Upholstery
  • Furniture—tops, fronts, AND underneath!

What’s more, we train our PROs to clean in very specific ways to ensure that dust actually leaves a home with them rather than simply sending it flying all around only to resettle on surfaces after they leave.

But even if you regularly use PRO techniques and checklists for busting household dust, there are plenty of easily overlooked places that tend to trap and accumulate dust over time, demanding at least occasional attention for a truly fresh and clean home. Here’s an expanded dusting checklist for those big deep-cleaning days:

  • Blinds, window treatments, curtain rods, and brackets
  • Doorways
  • Decorative trims, lintels, mantels
  • Overhead and hanging light fixtures, sconces
  • Large and small appliances, TVs, computers, stereo equipment (especially underneath and behind)
  • Keyboards, clickers, phone keypads (dust with compressed gas, which can be purchased at most office supply stores)
  • Plants
  • Window screens/spaces between screens and glass
  • Wine racks/bottles
  • Bookshelves/books/magazines/CDs and other media
  • Candles
  • Baskets and other decorative receptacles
  • Insides of drawers and cabinets, plus food cans and jars
  • Behind toilet tanks
  • Smoke/carbon monoxide detectors and alarm sensors (which may stop functioning or even be set off accidentally by too much dust!)

If all that sounds just too daunting, ask your local MaidPro about what PRO deep-cleaning services they offer!

 

Summer Stain Guide

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Summer is almost here! But, with more party, play, and free time comes more chances for little accidents that make household stains happen. Never fear! Simply bookmark this handy guide for treating common stains on carpets and furniture upholstery.

First, a few universal guides for treating ALL stains:

  • Before using any solutions, always test in an inconspicuous spot.
  • Start gentle and escalate slowly; repeat gentler steps several times, before moving to harsher methods that could discolor or otherwise damage stained surfaces.
  • Air dry completely between treatments as some stains only reappear when dry.
  • NEVER mix stain-fighting solutions, especially chlorine bleach with ammonia as it generates highly toxic fumes.
  • Avoid using high heat until you are sure a stain is gone completely, as this can set the stain forever.
  • When in doubt (or unsuccessful), call a PRO!

For most common stains, different solutions may be recommended depending on stain chemistry, but the same 4-step treatment method applies:

  1. Promptly blot away as much of the spill as possible using paper towels or clean white cloths. If a stain has dried, use a spoon or the back of a butter knife to scrape away as much as possible, starting at the edges and working inward. Then add a little cold water to re-moisten the stained area.
  2. Using solutions recommended below, alternately spritz, sponge, or dab onto the stain, then blot dry, using a clean white cloth or paper towel. Turn the cloth or towel with each blot until you can see no more of the stain transferring to the cloth.
  3. Allow to dry and repeat previous steps several times before moving on to harsher or store bought stain-removal solutions, which carry risks of doing damage.
  4. Once a stain is gone, thoroughly rinse away any solution residues and blot to dry.

Ketchup or mustard. Start with a solution of clear dishwashing liquid in lukewarm water. If stain persists and textile is light in color, try a weak solution of either hydrogen peroxide or ammonia in water, noting that both may have bleaching effects.

Popsicles and fruit-flavored drinks containing bright dyes. Start with a small quantity of clear dishwashing liquid in lukewarm water. If stain persists, use a powdered stain remover, per directions, then vacuum.

Wine. Start by pouring small amounts of club soda or cold water onto the stain and blotting. If stain persists and textile is light in color, try a few drops of diluted ammonia or a paste made from baking soda and water. If using a paste, gently scrape to loosen and vacuum after it dries.

Beer. Start with a solution of dishwashing soap and water. If that doesn’t work, try a weak solution of white vinegar and lukewarm water.

Blood. Start with a mild dishwashing liquid or non-alkaline detergent mixed with water. If bloodstain is dried or stubborn, try a small quantity of diluted ammonia or hydrogen peroxide, or, if bleaching is a concern, white vinegar.

Dusty, orange snack foods. Start with a mild dishwashing liquid mixed with water. If stain persists, a small amount of rubbing alcohol or diluted ammonia might do the trick.

Ice cream/chocolate (basically, any greasy/non-greasy combo stain). Blot as much away as possible with plain cold water, then use a diluted grease-busting dishwashing liquid or detergent containing enzymes.

15 spring-cleaning hacks for people who hate housework

Perfect for those who dread the annual deep clean, the money saving team at MaidPro have found the best tips for keeping your home neat and tidy without even breaking a sweat.

Forget expensive cleaning products and difficult organizing rituals, all of these tips are easy to achieve and won’t cost more than five pounds.

Some of the tips are unconventional, including pouring cola down the toilet but promise to have sparkling results.

The helpful pointers also include organizing tips such as keeping bed sets in a pillowcase and stacking clothes vertically not horizontally in drawers.

“These tips are great for those of us who hate cleaning as not only do they save time, they are cheaper alternatives to expensive cleaning products too.

“Saving time and money on cleaning leaves you feeling it’s a job well done and with more cash in your pocket too.”

1. Use a lemon to clean stainless steel

Annoying water stains on your tap and sink? Halve a lemon and use it to scrub stainless steel.

It will also make your kitchen smell fresh and citrusy.

Pour cola along the toilet bowl and flush for a sparkling result

2. Put a cup of vanilla extract in the oven

Sounds a bit crazy but by putting a few teaspoons of vanilla extract into a mug and baking for an hour, your whole home will smell gorgeous and inviting.

This is a trick estate agents swear by.

3. Steam clean microwave

Had a baked beans explosion? Clean your microwave the easy way by mixing two tablespoons of white vinegar and a few drops of your favorite essential oil with water and blast it for 5 minutes.

You’ll be left with a shiny clean microwave that smells amazing with zero scrubbing required.

4. Use cola to clean the toilet

You’ve probably heard about this one but never tried it, right?

It’s a miracle worker, just simply pour cola along the toilet bowl and flush for a sparkling result.

5. Use a cotton bud for cleaning keyboards

Instead of a wipe, take a damp cotton bud and use it to clean the difficult bits in between your keyboard.

6. Fold and stack clothes vertically not horizontally

Organise your t-shirt drawer by folding them and stacking vertically not horizontally.

This way you can flip through to find the one you want easily and minimize creasing which means less ironing, always good.

Use your dishwasher to clean children's toys

Use your dishwasher to clean children’s toys

7. Cover fridge shelves in cling film

Fridge spillages can be disastrous but easily cleaned up by simply covering the shelves with cling film or plastic wrap.

That way when something leaks or gets sticky, you can peel it off and start fresh, no cleaning necessary.

8. Microwave sponges

If you’ve only got one sponge to do all of the spring-cleaning with, disinfect it quickly and easily by putting it in your now spotless microwave for two minutes.

Just make sure your sponge doesn’t have any metal on it.

9. Store sheet sets in pillow cases

Finding matching bed sets can be a huge time waster but solved easily by organizing your linen.

Fold matching bed sets into the corresponding pillowcase so they are all kept together.

10. Stop your bin smelling of rubbish

Even after a bin is emptied, often a nasty lingering smell can remain.

To avoid this, sprinkle some baking soda or vinegar into the bottom of the bin to reduce the odor and lay down some clean newspaper to absorb any leftover moisture.

11. Clean toys in dishwasher

If your mucky pups’ toys are looking a bit worse for wear stick them in the dishwasher for a short cycle.

12. Make your bathroom smell constantly fresh

Add a few drops of essential oil to the inside of your toilet paper roll to keep your bathroom smelling lovely.

13. Refresh plastic containers

Get the leftover curry stains out of plastic containers by putting a solution of washing up liquid, bleach and water in them and microwaving until boiling point.

Once cooled, pour away and rinse.

14. Deep clean shower head

After having a shower, fill a sandwich bag with baking soda and vinegar and tie it around the showerhead using an elastic band.

Leave this to soak overnight then any debris will come off easily with an old toothbrush.

15. Use pastry brush to get crumbs out of toaster

Toast crumbs are notoriously difficult to get to but using a pastry brush can help sweep away the annoying trapped bits.

Six Unexpected Benefits of Green Cleaning

green-clean-benefits

If you’re looking to do more to protect the environment, switching to a greener way of cleaning is an excellent place to start.

We’re so serious about green cleaning here at MaidPro that we’ve dedicated a big section of our website to educating people about what it really means to clean green and how to choose solutions and tools that are simultaneously safe, environmentally friendly, and effective.

Aside from the satisfaction that comes with knowing you’re doing something tangible to protect the environment, there are other — often unexpected — benefits of going green when you clean. Here are six:

It’s really clean. If you take time to educate yourself and approach green cleaning correctly, you’ll end up with a home that is truly clean — versus one that simply looks and smells clean. Truly clean homes, in turn, look and smell clean for much longer than just a day or two.

Less stress about children and pets. Well-formulated green cleaning products contain fewer harsh chemicals and are less likely to generate dangerous fumes and chemical residues. That makes them safer for you, your kids, and your fur babies too.

More help. Because green cleaning is safer for kids, you can involve them more in helping you clean. Not only does it reduce your cleaning burden, it teaches kids important life values and skills.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T. If you hadn’t noticed, kids from preschool through college spend a great deal of time learning about environmental protection. They really care about the environment. When you demonstrate —  by action — that you care just as much, you earn their respect (which is a great thing especially if you have preteens and teenagers).

Less expensive (when you do it right). As we detail on our website, green cleaning is about much more than simply buying cleaners that are labeled green. It’s also about choosing products in concentrated forms that use less/recyclable packaging and cost less to transport and reusable (versus disposable) tools, such as washable rags. These choices generally save you money over time.

Sparks creativity. Once you get going with a green cleaning mindset — and thinking about all the ways you might apply to specific cleaning jobs   such as post-holiday or big-party cleanup —  it has a way of leading you into all sort of fun, creative activities, new personal interactions, and other changes that simply improve your quality of life.

 

Got Stinky House Syndrome? Green Ways to Rid Your Home of Odors

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The first thing you need to know about household odors is that you’re probably the worst judge of whether or not you’ve got them. That’s because the human body has a self-protective mechanism that quickly desensitizes your nose to lingering odors. So, if you suspect stinky house syndrome, start by asking a trusted friend to perform a sniff test immediately upon entering your home.

If the news is bad, the second thing you need to know is that—be they commercial/chemical, natural, or ‘green’—deodorizing agents work in one of three ways: they mask bad smells (short-term solution requiring repetition), interfere with your sense of smell (yikes!), or they eliminate odors at the source either by bonding chemically to neutralize odor-causing molecules or killing organisms (bacteria, molds, and mildews) that cause odors in the first place. When you remove the sources of bad odors in your home, you create a fresh, clean palette for adding all the scents and fragrances you really love. Our best advice for lasting—and green—household odor removal is this:

Open your windows! Just a few minutes of fresh, clean air works wonders for dissipating and displacing airborne odor-causing molecules—all the better if it’s a windy day.

Clean regularly. Regular and thorough home cleaning is, hands down, the most effective and ultimately greenest means of removing odor sources from your home. The reason: When you clean frequently, you can use mild, environmentally friendly solutions and still be effective at preventing big odors from developing. But, when you allow odor-causing agents to dig into surfaces and textiles, you need much stronger, harsher chemicals to address the unpleasant smells that result.

Deep clean if it’s been a while. If you’ve been less-than-dedicated to regular house cleaning for some time, deep-cleaning might be necessary to address well-established odor sources before regular cleaning can be truly effective. Key odor-producing areas on which to focus include: toilet tanks, drains, refrigerators/freezers, trash receptacles, recycling bins, garbage disposals, oven spills, washing machine (sanitize), mattresses, heavy bed linens, curtains, carpets, furniture upholstery, and your dishwasher’s food grinder and filter.

Use your science. Baking soda (which is alkaline) works well as a so-called ‘green’ deodorizer because it bonds chemically to neutralize acid-based odor-causing agents. The reverse may be true for acidic substances such as white vinegar or used coffee grounds, which are also often recommended as ‘green’ odor removers. The key takeaway here is that you need to know the basic chemistry or biology of an odor you’re attacking in order to determine what substance will be effective at eliminating it. For serious odor sources such as black mold or pet urine, it’s best to call seasoned pros (like MaidPro’s PROs) who know how to remove both effectively and safely.

Once you’re done eliminating all the sources of foul odors in your home, try these DIY projects to make your home smell amazing!

Cleaning Myths Debunked: Carpets

maidpro cleaning

There’s nothing quite like the comfy feeling of plush carpeting under your toes in the morning. But, without regular surface and deep-cleaning, carpets can easily turn into incubators for all sorts of unwanted guests in your home. Before you get too worried, take heart that humans have been decorating their homes with carpets for multiple millennia and still the species flourishes. Be grateful for your hearty immune system and read on to learn why regular carpet cleaning is so important!

Myth #1 Your carpet is dirtier than a toilet seat!
TRUE Typical carpet contains roughly 200,000 bacteria per square inch on average, making it technically 4,000 times germ-ier than a toilet seat. Most toilet seats are smooth, sealed surfaces that get cleaned and disinfected regularly, whereas many consumers wait years between professional carpet cleanings.

Myth #2 Carpet can hide 1-lb of dirt per yard and still appear clean.
TRUE This is where it get’s scary: those 200,000 bacteria per square inch feed on the millions of dead skin cells shed every hour by each person living in your home. Add in the daily tracks of living (pet dander, food crumbs, pollen, and soil off of the bottom of your shoes), and your carpet becomes a veritable Vegas Buffet for germs and bugs.

Myth #3 2,000 dust mites can survive on a single ounce of carpet dust.
TRUE While dust mites will gladly set up shop in mattresses and furniture, they are particularly fond of carpets due to their buffet of foods and the reasonably protected environment (you wash sheets regularly…carpets, not so much). If anyone in your home has a dust mite allergy, stick to hard-surface floors and washable area rugs as much as possible, especially in bedrooms where human dander is most prevalent.

Myth #4 Norovirus can live for up to two weeks in carpet.
TRUE This should be a death knell for the 5 Second Rule where food and carpets are concerned! Studies prove that norovirus can live for over 12 days in even regularly vacuumed carpeting. If your family seems particularly prone to stomach bugs, get carpets steam cleaned at a temperature of at least 158° F for five minutes or 212° F for one minute to completely kill off norovirus.

Myth #5 Carpets filter air by trapping dirt, dust, and germs in their fibers.
TRUE Carpeting is actually one of the most powerful natural air filters in your home, trapping dirt and germs from the air. Due to temperature differentials from inside to outside, homes actually breathe through the walls and roof. Carpeting acts as a huge, fluffy pre-filter, which is why the edges of carpets get dirty so fast even when you vacuum regularly.

Myth #6 Vacuuming regularly is a sufficient way to cope with germs trapped in carpets.
FALSE Even the most powerful vacuums struggle to extract dirt and germs from the base of carpet fibers.

Moral of the story Make a habit of removing shoes when entering your home—or at least put down washable entry mats and runners and wash regularly. Invest in having carpets cleaned and extracted professionally at least once a year. In between professional cleaning and extraction, vacuum thoroughly at least once a week, using a high-quality machine with a motorized brush. You might also consider investing in a HEPA filtration type of vacuum—such as the ones used by our cleaning PROs. If you don’t want to be the one to do all that weekly vacuuming, remember MaidPro is always here to help!

 

Cleaning Myths Debunked: Mold & Mildew

maidpro NJ

Uncontrolled growth of mold in your home can be a scary, dangerous, and expensive thing. But, knowing a few important facts about mold can help you to address the risks and keep your home healthy for a lifetime. Here are five big mold myths debunked:


Myth: Mold & mildew are the same thing.

Mildew is powdery or downy white, yellow, or brown-colored fungus that grows in a flat pattern on surfaces and can be scrubbed off easily with a spray cleaner and brush. Mold is a fuzzy, aggressively growing fungus that creates difficult-to- kill spore clusters that behave like roots and grow deep into porous surfaces such as drywall, tile grout, and wood. Mold can be blue, green, yellow, brown, gray, black, or white. In bathrooms, mold roots can travel all the way through grout, behind tiles, and into walls and house framing. Mold consumes and destroys surfaces and, depending on the variety, may also cause health problems, including sinus infections, headaches, allergies, inflamed respiratory airways, and more.


Myth: Bleach kills 100% of mold and mildew.

Bleach only kills mold and mildew on tops of surfaces. The chemical structure of bleach disallows its absorption into porous surfaces, no matter how much you apply, even when undiluted. The surface top may look clean and white, but just a few millimeters underneath the mold is still alive and will start re-growing within minutes.


Myth: Once a surface looks clean and white, all mold has been removed.

Bleach requires a full five-minute soak time with at least three-quarters of a cup of bleach per gallon of water to kill surface mold spores. The problem is that bleach makes mold look white before it dies, so people often rinse bleach away before it has killed any mold at all. Worse yet, the water in your bleach solution soaks into porous surfaces and feeds the deep mold you are trying to kill. Unchecked, the mold grows deeper into walls and studs until structural damage and health impacts become so bad the problem can no longer be ignored.


Myth: If grout looks good after cleaning with bleach, it was just mildew.

This is a dangerous half truth and a big reason why so many home owners let mold damage get out of control in their bathrooms. There is a simple test: if you can scrub stains off easily with a bleach-free bathroom cleaner, it’s probably just mildew. If you use a bleach-based cleaner and the stains return after a few days in roughly the same spots, you’ve likely got mold growing beneath the surface.


Myth: Once mold is dead, the problem is solved.

This is, by far, the falsest claim of all. It is impossible to keep new mold spores from entering your home as it can grow anywhere it finds food—decaying matter such as fallen leaves, garbage, or trash—and moisture—which can be anything from leaky pipes to air humidity—in temperatures ranging from 32-120°F. Even mold on food in your freezer doesn’t die; it merely goes dormant until it warms up! If you can survive in an environment, so too can mold. What is more, there are varieties of mold spores that are just as toxic and allergy-inducing when dead as when they are alive and growing.


Myth: Homeowners can easily solve mold problems on their own.

The only way to truly solve a mold problem is by removing infected materials and the sources of moisture that started the problem. Controlling indoor air humidity, repairing leaky pipes and shower walls, resealing and replacing porous grout, caulking, and more are all parts of the solution. Most mold sprays are simply fancy-marketed bleach sprays that remove mold stains, but do nothing to address root problems. As a rule of thumb, if you have a mold-affected area larger than 10 square feet, immediately seek the help of a professional mold-abatement service.

Spring Cleaning Tips: Tackling the Bathroom

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Every room in your home needs a deeper-than-usual clean and refresh at least once or twice a year. With its fresh air and tone of rebirth and renewal, there is no time like spring for finding the inspiration to get it all done. Here are five tips for tackling the bathroom this spring:

Get into the nooks and crannies. Bathrooms have plenty of tiny, inconvenient-to-clean spaces that you might pass over on regular daily or weekly cleanings. For example, when is the last time you dusted out the narrow space between your toilet tank and the wall? Or, the last time you cleaned just under and around the lid of the tank? Both are great spaces for mildew and other germs to hang out and multiply. Other oft neglected spots include around the bases of faucets and fixtures where soap scum and grit builds up and hardens, often requiring scraping for a true clean. While you’re at it, take a good look at your grout, which can usually be brightened up with the right cleaner, a small sturdy brush, and a bit of elbow grease.

Inspect and discard all expired stuff. If you have unused prescription meds, bring them to your pharmacy for proper disposal or find out if your city or town offers a drug take-back program. Expired OTC meds can go right into the trash. Be sure to inspect all lotions, creams, and makeup items too, as many have surprisingly short shelf lives. Toothbrushes should be replaced about once every three months and be sure to store new ones in an upright position to enable complete air drying between uses, experts say.

Purge the excess. As bathrooms tend to have limited space, give careful consideration to everything you store there. Is there a curling wand that gets used only 2-3 times a year taking up precious real estate? Are there five hair brushes, where one might do? Are you storing large refill containers of shampoos and conditioners bought at wholesale clubs? Remove rarely-used items to a different location, such as a linen closet. The less you keep in your bathroom, the more functional it becomes and the easier it will be to keep clean and tidy all week long.

Do make room for critical supplies. No one wants to be the person using a bathroom when it runs out of toilet paper, hand soap, or towels. Nice baskets filled with unwrapped toilet paper rolls and a soap display add decorative elements to your bathroom, while also making family members and guests feel most comfortable. Pre-moistened wipes or a spray bottle and clean rag near to hand make it easy for you and family members to wipe up toothpaste gobs, stray hairs, and other small daily messes. If you ever entertain overnight guests, extra new toothbrushes are great extra items to keep on hand as well.

Get organized. If your bathroom often resembles a jumble sale, it might be worth investing in a few elegant, yet simple and inexpensive organizing solutions. Think wooden drawer organizers, canvas totes, shower caddies,and the like.

Refresh your look. Your bathroom is one of the easiest and least expensive rooms to completely re-style with a new look or color scheme, especially if floors, counters, and tile are white or neutral in tone. Consider changing up your shower curtain, bath mat, or towels and ‘shopping at home’ for things you might repurpose to add style and keep your bathroom organized. A china sugar bowl, for example, makes a great decorative container for cotton balls or tooth-floss picks, while a shallow serving tray can be a great way to corral lots of small items you want near to hand such as lotions, creams, and perfume bottles. There are also hundreds of chic, decorative paper designs available at low costs for lining shelves and adding visual pop to the insides of bathroom cabinets and drawers.

 

Spring Cleaning Tips: Turning over Closets

maispro-springclean

With spring busting out all over, the last thing you might want to be doing is turning over your wardrobe from winter to spring/summer. Use these eight steps to get the job done fast yet effectively:

Purge, purge, purge. Start by taking everything out and inspecting each item as you do. Haven’t worn it at least once or twice in the past season? Is it getting a little shabby? Does it fail to fit well and flatter your figure? Is it cheap, trendy, and unlikely to be in-style next season? If you answer yes to any of the above, consider donating or tossing.

Physically clean storage spaces. Thoroughly vacuum closets and drawers; dust and be prepared to re-line shelves and drawers if needed. While you’re at it, discard broken and bent hangers, empty dry-cleaning bags, shoe boxes, retail tags, and any other detritus that might have collected in clothing storage spaces over the past season.

Launder or dry clean all garments before storing. Even if it looks and smells clean, if it has been worn, you can be sure it’s harboring some form of human dander that will become food for dust mites, mold, and mildew.

Choose plastic. Cardboard and corrugated boxes are prone to bugginess and may also absorb moisture and odors. Invest in sturdy plastic containers that seal well as these will last virtually a lifetime. Protect wools with cedar chips or planks, but be aware that cedar may stain certain fabrics, so wrap accordingly.

Package with care. Fold neatly, wrapping delicate items in tissue paper, and stuffing boots and handbags to ensure they hold their shape and come out of storage ready to wear next year.

Pack with your next seasonal turnover in mind. For example, group heavier sweaters, winter outerwear, and so forth and place into the least accessible locations. Next, group long-sleeved shirts, lighter sweaters and slacks, and any other transitional clothing to be easily accessible and ready to pull out either for unseasonable or transitional weather days.

If possible, choose dark, dry places to store your containers. Even clothing packed in tightly-sealed plastic can take on permanent musty odors if stored in humid spaces such as basements. For high-value items, consider storing professionally; many dry cleaners will store for free or at very low cost.

Use the turnover of seasons as an opportunity to rethink how you organize your wardrobe. By color? Type of garment? Whole outfits? What has not worked well in the past? Might there be a different system that better suits your personality and lifestyle? While you’re at it, check out different folding techniques that can help you to better optimize your use of space, make it easier to put away laundry, and to see everything you have available when you are trying to to put together that perfect outfit.

The MaidPro House Cleaning Difference Newark, DE

New Castle County’s premier home cleaners.

At MaidPro Newark, creating clean houses is our priority. We are located in Newark, and deliver personalized, precise services to Bear, Christiana, Claymont, Edgemoor, Elsmere, Greenville, Hockessin, Manor, Marshallton, New Castle, Newark, Newport, Pike Creek, Port Penn, Stanton, Talleyville, Wilmington and Yorklyn. Whether you want shiny floors in Claymont or sparkling bathrooms in Yorklyn, just call us for all your Wilmington area residential cleaning needs.

Professional maid service, with a personal touch.

We know and trust our MaidPro employees on a personal and professional level. Our cleaning PROs undergo thorough background checks prior to employment and are bonded and insured. They also receive extensive maid service training to instill the skills needed to clean to the highest standards—yours! And while we strive to help our employees work to their greatest ability, we also make sure to have fun. Because when you love what you do, it shows in your work.