The Dust Overlooked

dust

Household dust is a mix of many things: plant pollen, pet dander, insect waste, carpet and clothing fibers, dirt, bacteria, fungi, and, yes, even a few dead human skin cells (though not as many as some might have you believe!). An abundance of the stuff not only makes your home look drab, but also traps odors, and can pose grave health risks for people with allergies, asthma, or other respiratory illnesses.

MaidPro’s 49-Point Checklist™—which all our cleaning PROs use to guide their work—takes a thorough approach to busting household dust. On each clean, we task our PROs with addressing:

  • Baseboards
  • Windowsills
  • Floors
  • Lamps/lampshades
  • Picture frames
  • Ceiling fans
  • Upholstery
  • Furniture—tops, fronts, AND underneath!

What’s more, we train our PROs to clean in very specific ways to ensure that dust actually leaves a home with them rather than simply sending it flying all around only to resettle on surfaces after they leave.

But even if you regularly use PRO techniques and checklists for busting household dust, there are plenty of easily overlooked places that tend to trap and accumulate dust over time, demanding at least occasional attention for a truly fresh and clean home. Here’s an expanded dusting checklist for those big deep-cleaning days:

  • Blinds, window treatments, curtain rods, and brackets
  • Doorways
  • Decorative trims, lintels, mantels
  • Overhead and hanging light fixtures, sconces
  • Large and small appliances, TVs, computers, stereo equipment (especially underneath and behind)
  • Keyboards, clickers, phone keypads (dust with compressed gas, which can be purchased at most office supply stores)
  • Plants
  • Window screens/spaces between screens and glass
  • Wine racks/bottles
  • Bookshelves/books/magazines/CDs and other media
  • Candles
  • Baskets and other decorative receptacles
  • Insides of drawers and cabinets, plus food cans and jars
  • Behind toilet tanks
  • Smoke/carbon monoxide detectors and alarm sensors (which may stop functioning or even be set off accidentally by too much dust!)

If all that sounds just too daunting, ask your local MaidPro about what PRO deep-cleaning services they offer!

 

Get Ready for Spring: A Room-by-Room Purge Guide

spring-purge

Spring is a time of rebirth! In preparation for your big spring cleaning ritual, now is the time to start sorting and discarding all the items that have collected in the last year. And there’s much more to it than just clothes closets and drawers. Here’s a handy room-by-room checklist of other things to focus on what to purge for spring:

Kitchen. From cabinets, pantry, refrigerator, and freezer, inspect and toss all foods that are past their sell- or use-by dates. If canned food is un-dated, decide based on: Is the packaging damaged or deteriorated in any way? Does the food appear discolored? Can you remember buying it? And, are you likely to ever consume it? For frozen foods, check this handy guide. When in doubt, throw it out!
Other things to purge in the kitchen include unmatched food storage containers and lids, chipped and cracked crockery, recipes and cookbooks you no longer use. Don’t forget to clean out the junk drawer too. Early spring is also a great time to replace water filters and to have cooking and carving knives professionally sharpened.

Bathroom. In addition to disposing (safely and securely) of expired over-the-counter and prescription medications, be sure to inspect and replace all aging cosmetics, toothbrushes, flossers, and so forth.

Family living areas. Look to purge broken toys and games and puzzles that are missing pieces. With spring-fair and yard-sale season coming, it’s also a great time to sort through and donate bulky media, such as books, magazines, CDs, DVDs, and video games. If you didn’t already do so with the change to daylight saving time, be sure to test and replace batteries in all smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

Laundry. Say goodbye to all those perpetually unmatched socks and dingy whites. Discard or fix garments with holes, missing buttons, broken zippers. While you’re at it, clear out accumulated lint in the vent that extends from your dryer to the outside (which is a big fire hazard). Cash in the coin hoard, and buy yourself a well-deserved treat.

Family closets and storage areas. Especially if you’ve got kids, there’s a good chance you have lots of outgrown (or unmatched) shoes, jackets, mittens, gloves, and other gear you can move along to free up space. It’s also a great time to take stock of all the spring and summer stuff you saved from last year—such as sporting equipment, flip flops, sunscreens, bug sprays, and so forth—to see what might need replacing.

Office/homework area. Once your tax returns are filed, many of the paper records you’ve been hanging onto can be safely shredded and recycled. Pick a rainy spring day to focus on cleaning up electronic devices—purging old emails, archiving files, downloading and organizing photos, and deleting those never-used apps.

15 spring-cleaning hacks for people who hate housework

Perfect for those who dread the annual deep clean, the money saving team at MaidPro have found the best tips for keeping your home neat and tidy without even breaking a sweat.

Forget expensive cleaning products and difficult organizing rituals, all of these tips are easy to achieve and won’t cost more than five pounds.

Some of the tips are unconventional, including pouring cola down the toilet but promise to have sparkling results.

The helpful pointers also include organizing tips such as keeping bed sets in a pillowcase and stacking clothes vertically not horizontally in drawers.

“These tips are great for those of us who hate cleaning as not only do they save time, they are cheaper alternatives to expensive cleaning products too.

“Saving time and money on cleaning leaves you feeling it’s a job well done and with more cash in your pocket too.”

1. Use a lemon to clean stainless steel

Annoying water stains on your tap and sink? Halve a lemon and use it to scrub stainless steel.

It will also make your kitchen smell fresh and citrusy.

Pour cola along the toilet bowl and flush for a sparkling result

2. Put a cup of vanilla extract in the oven

Sounds a bit crazy but by putting a few teaspoons of vanilla extract into a mug and baking for an hour, your whole home will smell gorgeous and inviting.

This is a trick estate agents swear by.

3. Steam clean microwave

Had a baked beans explosion? Clean your microwave the easy way by mixing two tablespoons of white vinegar and a few drops of your favorite essential oil with water and blast it for 5 minutes.

You’ll be left with a shiny clean microwave that smells amazing with zero scrubbing required.

4. Use cola to clean the toilet

You’ve probably heard about this one but never tried it, right?

It’s a miracle worker, just simply pour cola along the toilet bowl and flush for a sparkling result.

5. Use a cotton bud for cleaning keyboards

Instead of a wipe, take a damp cotton bud and use it to clean the difficult bits in between your keyboard.

6. Fold and stack clothes vertically not horizontally

Organise your t-shirt drawer by folding them and stacking vertically not horizontally.

This way you can flip through to find the one you want easily and minimize creasing which means less ironing, always good.

Use your dishwasher to clean children's toys

Use your dishwasher to clean children’s toys

7. Cover fridge shelves in cling film

Fridge spillages can be disastrous but easily cleaned up by simply covering the shelves with cling film or plastic wrap.

That way when something leaks or gets sticky, you can peel it off and start fresh, no cleaning necessary.

8. Microwave sponges

If you’ve only got one sponge to do all of the spring-cleaning with, disinfect it quickly and easily by putting it in your now spotless microwave for two minutes.

Just make sure your sponge doesn’t have any metal on it.

9. Store sheet sets in pillow cases

Finding matching bed sets can be a huge time waster but solved easily by organizing your linen.

Fold matching bed sets into the corresponding pillowcase so they are all kept together.

10. Stop your bin smelling of rubbish

Even after a bin is emptied, often a nasty lingering smell can remain.

To avoid this, sprinkle some baking soda or vinegar into the bottom of the bin to reduce the odor and lay down some clean newspaper to absorb any leftover moisture.

11. Clean toys in dishwasher

If your mucky pups’ toys are looking a bit worse for wear stick them in the dishwasher for a short cycle.

12. Make your bathroom smell constantly fresh

Add a few drops of essential oil to the inside of your toilet paper roll to keep your bathroom smelling lovely.

13. Refresh plastic containers

Get the leftover curry stains out of plastic containers by putting a solution of washing up liquid, bleach and water in them and microwaving until boiling point.

Once cooled, pour away and rinse.

14. Deep clean shower head

After having a shower, fill a sandwich bag with baking soda and vinegar and tie it around the showerhead using an elastic band.

Leave this to soak overnight then any debris will come off easily with an old toothbrush.

15. Use pastry brush to get crumbs out of toaster

Toast crumbs are notoriously difficult to get to but using a pastry brush can help sweep away the annoying trapped bits.

Six Unexpected Benefits of Green Cleaning

green-clean-benefits

If you’re looking to do more to protect the environment, switching to a greener way of cleaning is an excellent place to start.

We’re so serious about green cleaning here at MaidPro that we’ve dedicated a big section of our website to educating people about what it really means to clean green and how to choose solutions and tools that are simultaneously safe, environmentally friendly, and effective.

Aside from the satisfaction that comes with knowing you’re doing something tangible to protect the environment, there are other — often unexpected — benefits of going green when you clean. Here are six:

It’s really clean. If you take time to educate yourself and approach green cleaning correctly, you’ll end up with a home that is truly clean — versus one that simply looks and smells clean. Truly clean homes, in turn, look and smell clean for much longer than just a day or two.

Less stress about children and pets. Well-formulated green cleaning products contain fewer harsh chemicals and are less likely to generate dangerous fumes and chemical residues. That makes them safer for you, your kids, and your fur babies too.

More help. Because green cleaning is safer for kids, you can involve them more in helping you clean. Not only does it reduce your cleaning burden, it teaches kids important life values and skills.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T. If you hadn’t noticed, kids from preschool through college spend a great deal of time learning about environmental protection. They really care about the environment. When you demonstrate —  by action — that you care just as much, you earn their respect (which is a great thing especially if you have preteens and teenagers).

Less expensive (when you do it right). As we detail on our website, green cleaning is about much more than simply buying cleaners that are labeled green. It’s also about choosing products in concentrated forms that use less/recyclable packaging and cost less to transport and reusable (versus disposable) tools, such as washable rags. These choices generally save you money over time.

Sparks creativity. Once you get going with a green cleaning mindset — and thinking about all the ways you might apply to specific cleaning jobs   such as post-holiday or big-party cleanup —  it has a way of leading you into all sort of fun, creative activities, new personal interactions, and other changes that simply improve your quality of life.

 

Convincing Your Kids to Chip in around the Holidays

kids-help-holidaysIt’s tempting to use the holidays as a carrot to elicit positive behaviors from kids such as helping more with tidying and cleaning around the house. But there are helpful and not-so-helpful ways of going about it. Here are a few tips and tricks for getting more help from your kids while avoiding unintended drama or consequences:

Emphasize the nice part of the nice-naughty dichotomy. ‘Are there old toys we might declutter and donate to make space for the new?‘ Or, ‘For every room you dust, you can earn a dollar to donate to our local food bank’ (adding points to your ‘nice’ column just in time for the holidays).

Game-ify. For example: ‘Whoever finishes cleaning their room first gets to lick the cookie-icing spoon or hang a favorite decoration.’ OR ‘Whoever clears the table after dinner gets to open and enjoy today’s treat from our holiday countdown calendar.’

Chores before beloved holiday traditions. ‘If we get the house cleaned this morning, we can [fill in a favorite holiday activity] this afternoon.’

Deploy ‘outside agents’ with extreme care. Understand there’s an inherent creepiness in having one’s behavior watched and judged in every moment, either by an omniscient gift giver from the North or even an active spy in your home (e.g., Elf on a Shelf). While some kids will delight in the spy’s mischievous antics, others may be secretly terrified or stressed out by its presence. But making sure the spy seems super benevolent can backfire, too. Should you decide to invite in the spy into your home, know that kids will discuss and compare their antics amongst themselves at school, adding pressure for you to be creative on a daily basis at an already-hectic time of year. You can relieve some of the pressure by borrowing ideas from others or creating a unique version of the concept to do away with the comparisons altogether.

Create opportunities for redemption. Let kids know that the great holiday gift giver is an eminently forgiving soul and that helping more around the house is a great way to redeem past mistakes they might be fretting about in secret (and all the better if the help is unsolicited!). You can also avoid ‘rebound’ bad and unhelpful behaviors by resolving to extend positive incentives for nice behavior throughout the entire New Year.

Those Deadly Dust Bunnies.

Did you know that those harmless looking “Dust Bunnies” could be harmful to your health?

Have you ever done some cleaning and noticed little balls of dust under the couch, behind the furniture, or even hiding out near the laundry dryer? It’s just a collection of lint and dead skin cells, no big deal, right? Heck, with people calling them cute names like “dust bunnies” it’s easy to believe they’re virtually harmless. That’s what I used to believe, anyhow, but now I see them as vicious creatures set out to destroy me! Okay, maybe not so much, but here’s some motivation for keeping your home clean.

Research from Duke University found that dust bunnies are more than a collection of lint and skin. In every single house the researchers tested, there were deadly chemicals mixed with the dust bunnies, chief among them being some fire retardants – chemicals that protect against fire. They claimed that there were more chemicals concentrated in dust bunnies than even sewage sludge! Yuck. Where do these harmful chemicals even come from?1422410_776996912355625_6457037856986359201_n

The dusty rabbit outlaws can be found in bandit hideouts beneath furniture, electronics, and insulation (the part of the house used to keep the air fresh in the summer and warm in the winter). Flame retardants are put on these products to stop them from lighting up quickly in the event of a fire. If only we could light those long-eared monsters on fire!

The researchers found that many of these chemicals were found lurking inside people as well! According to the researchers, just about all Americans have flame retardants in their bodies. Hmmm… but if flame retardants protect against flames, does that make us slightly fireproof?

Not in the slightest. There is a type of flame retardant called Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) that looks very similar to normal chemicals that are supposed to be in our bodies – like the kind that help with brain development and metabolism in adults. However, just like those pesky dust bunnies, they’re just blending in. Long-term studies have shown that individuals with high amounts of PBDE tend to have problems with paying attention, moving their bodies, and learning. Yikes, that’s serious.

Dust bunnies don’t seem so cute anymore do they? Like I said, they are vicious creatures, and should probably be called dust “demons.” Who would have thought vacuuming could be a lifesaver?

If your vacuum is not working or you want to call in the professionals, contact MaidPro. Our”Pro’s” will eradicate those pesky “Dust Bunnies” and leave you home clean and healthy.