Six Unexpected Benefits of Green Cleaning

green-clean-benefits

If you’re looking to do more to protect the environment, switching to a greener way of cleaning is an excellent place to start.

We’re so serious about green cleaning here at MaidPro that we’ve dedicated a big section of our website to educating people about what it really means to clean green and how to choose solutions and tools that are simultaneously safe, environmentally friendly, and effective.

Aside from the satisfaction that comes with knowing you’re doing something tangible to protect the environment, there are other — often unexpected — benefits of going green when you clean. Here are six:

It’s really clean. If you take time to educate yourself and approach green cleaning correctly, you’ll end up with a home that is truly clean — versus one that simply looks and smells clean. Truly clean homes, in turn, look and smell clean for much longer than just a day or two.

Less stress about children and pets. Well-formulated green cleaning products contain fewer harsh chemicals and are less likely to generate dangerous fumes and chemical residues. That makes them safer for you, your kids, and your fur babies too.

More help. Because green cleaning is safer for kids, you can involve them more in helping you clean. Not only does it reduce your cleaning burden, it teaches kids important life values and skills.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T. If you hadn’t noticed, kids from preschool through college spend a great deal of time learning about environmental protection. They really care about the environment. When you demonstrate —  by action — that you care just as much, you earn their respect (which is a great thing especially if you have preteens and teenagers).

Less expensive (when you do it right). As we detail on our website, green cleaning is about much more than simply buying cleaners that are labeled green. It’s also about choosing products in concentrated forms that use less/recyclable packaging and cost less to transport and reusable (versus disposable) tools, such as washable rags. These choices generally save you money over time.

Sparks creativity. Once you get going with a green cleaning mindset — and thinking about all the ways you might apply to specific cleaning jobs   such as post-holiday or big-party cleanup —  it has a way of leading you into all sort of fun, creative activities, new personal interactions, and other changes that simply improve your quality of life.

 

Countdown To Thanksgiving Day!

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We’re not going to pretend that pulling off Thanksgiving dinner is a cinch. But you can make your life easier by planning ahead, breaking big tasks into smaller parts, and by keeping a checklist of what you have left to do.

Use this T-Day Timeline to get a sense of what to do and when. You’ll be so organized that you may actually spend quality time with your family on Thanksgiving!

2 WEEKS PRIOR

* Prepare the menu.

* Look up recipes and create your shopping list, including what cooking supplies and utensils that you will need.

* Raid cabinets for things that you may already have.

* Write a cooking timeline that shows which dishes or components of dishes can be cooked in advance.

* Determine what, if anything, guests are bringing.

1 WEEK PRIOR

* Clean out the refrigerator and freezer.

* Go shopping for everything except fresh produce, seafood and bread.

5 DAYS PRIOR

* Thaw your turkey in the refrigerator.

2 DAYS PRIOR

* Clean your home (or call MaidPro!)

* Brine your turkey.

* Wash table linens, dishes, silverware, etc.

* Confirm the final guest count.

1 DAY PRIOR

* Shop for fresh produce, seafood and bread.

* Set the table, including bringing in extra chairs and table leaves.

* Prepare anything that can be done in advance, such as pre-chopping vegetables or making pie crusts.

THANKSGIVING DAY!

* Season, stuff and cook your bird.

* Make your side dishes.

* Reheat pre-cooked food right before the meal.

* Most importantly: eat, drink and enjoy!

 

Happy Thanksgiving from your friends at MaidPro!

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Green Cleaning Myths Debunked

myth versus reality

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established little by way of guidelines for what constitutes green cleaning solutions or practices. So – into the void – has flown a steady stream of misinformation and bogus so-called ‘green’ cleaning solutions. Here are four common green-cleaning myths and explanations for why they don’t hold water:

Myth No. 1: Cleaning with water alone is a safe and effective way to clean and protect surfaces.Dirt is complicated – a mix of particles, dead bugs, skin cells, germs, and oils, to name just a few. Since water and oil don’t mix, oily solids get left behind, darkening and scratching surfaces and making them appear dull. The water itself can also leave mineral deposits, increasing complexity of the dirt and making it even tougher to clean over time.
Myth No. 2: You need a mop and large bucket of soapy water to get a floor really clean. Well designed cleaners use solvents (to loosen and dissolve oily soils), builders (to bond with minerals in the water) and surfactants (to bond with oily soils and suspend them in the water). While a high-quality cleaner can suspend massive amounts of dirt in just millimeters of water, poorly designed cleaners do not keep dirt suspended, so it falls back onto the floor where the mop just pushes it around. Your mop is crucial too. If you want a floor to be truly clean, you need a highly absorbent mop to remove dirty water.
Myth No. 3: Cleaning with water and vinegar is an effective and environmentally friendly cleaner.Vinegar is just a mild acid. There are no surfactants, solvents, builders or oxidizing agents needed to remove complex soils. The result is not that much different from cleaning with water alone and it can make your surface a breeding ground for germs, which is definitely not green and potentially dangerous for your family.
Myth No. 4: Green cleaners are less likely than household or commercial cleaners to leave harmful residues on surfaces. A poorly formulated cleaner purported to be ‘green’ may not have the correct surfactancy or cleaning chemistry, which means both its chemicals and germ-containing soils can fall out of solution and onto the surfaces you are cleaning. A well-formulated cleaner will keep its chemicals in solution and soils in suspension, leaving less residue and unhealthy soils on the surfaces of your home.
The EPA defines green cleaners as those made with environmentally-friendly ingredients to preserve human health and environmental quality. There is also Design for the Environment (DfE), an EPA partner program that screens product ingredients and awards them a DfE logo if they pose “the least concern among chemicals in their class.” If you care about green cleaning, your best courses of action are to: Look for products with the DfE logo that are also effective – meaning you can use less to get better results. Also, look for manufacturers that: ship in concentrates to reduce fuel use, reduce packaging, cut water use and pollution, and select renewable/sustainable ingredient sources whenever possible.
Finally, you can use cleaning companies (such as MaidPro) that do the following: group clients geographically to cut fuel use; use reusable bottles, buckets and bags; use phone/email versus paper; use efficient washing machines and washable, reusable microfiber rags that capture dirt, dust and allergens; use CRI Green label vacuums to protect indoor air quality; buy supplies in concentrated forms; pick environmentally friendly suppliers; train employees to use the correct amounts of cleaning chemicals and make responsible use of disinfectants on critical surfaces to protect client health.Remember, if it’s not clean, it’s not green!

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‘Green’ Cleaning Myths Debunked

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established little by way of guidelines for what constitutes green cleaning solutions or practices. So – into the void – has flown a steady stream of misinformation and bogus so-called ‘green’ cleaning solutions. Here are four common green-cleaning myths and explanations for why they don’t hold water:

Myth No. 1: Cleaning with water alone is a safe and effective way to clean and protect surfaces. Dirt is complicated – a mix of particles, dead bugs, skin cells, germs, and oils, to name just a few. Since water and oil don’t mix, oily solids get left behind, darkening and scratching surfaces and making them appear dull. The water itself can also leave mineral deposits, increasing complexity of the dirt and making it even tougher to clean over time.

Myth No. 2: You need a mop and large bucket of soapy water to get a floor really clean. Well designed cleaners use solvents (to loosen and dissolve oily soils), builders (to bond with minerals in the water) and surfactants (to bond with oily soils and suspend them in the water). While a high-quality cleaner can suspend massive amounts of dirt in just millimeters of water, poorly designed cleaners do not keep dirt suspended, so it falls back onto the floor where the mop just pushes it around. Your mop is crucial too. If you want a floor to be truly clean, you need a highly absorbent mop to remove dirty water.

Myth No. 3: Cleaning with water and vinegar is an effective and environmentally friendly cleaner. Vinegar is just a mild acid. There are no surfactants, solvents, builders or oxidizing agents needed to remove complex soils. The result is not that much different from cleaning with water alone and it can make your surface a breeding ground for germs, which is definitely not green and potentially dangerous for your family.
Myth No. 4: Green cleaners are less likely than household or commercial cleaners to leave harmful residues on surfaces. A poorly formulated cleaner purported to be ‘green’ may not have the correct surfactancy or cleaning chemistry, which means both its chemicals and germ-containing soils can fall out of solution and onto the surfaces you are cleaning. A well-formulated cleaner will keep its chemicals in solution and soils in suspension, leaving less residue and unhealthy soils on the surfaces of your home.
The EPA defines green cleaners as those made with environmentally-friendly ingredients to preserve human health and environmental quality. There is also Design for the Environment (DfE), an EPA partner program that screens product ingredients and awards them a DfE logo if they pose “the least concern among chemicals in their class.” If you care about green cleaning, your best courses of action are to: Look for products with the DfE logo that are also effective – meaning you can use less to get better results. Also, look for manufacturers that: ship in concentrates to reduce fuel use, reduce packaging, cut water use and pollution, and select renewable/sustainable ingredient sources whenever possible.
Finally, you can use cleaning companies (such as MaidPro) that do the following: group clients geographically to cut fuel use; use reusable bottles, buckets and bags; use phone/email versus paper; use efficient washing machines and washable, reusable microfiber rags that capture dirt, dust and allergens; use CRI Green label vacuums to protect indoor air quality; buy supplies in concentrated forms; pick environmentally friendly suppliers; train employees to use the correct amounts of cleaning chemicals and make responsible use of disinfectants on critical surfaces to protect client health.
Remember, if it’s not clean, it’s not green!