The Dust Overlooked

dust

Household dust is a mix of many things: plant pollen, pet dander, insect waste, carpet and clothing fibers, dirt, bacteria, fungi, and, yes, even a few dead human skin cells (though not as many as some might have you believe!). An abundance of the stuff not only makes your home look drab, but also traps odors, and can pose grave health risks for people with allergies, asthma, or other respiratory illnesses.

MaidPro’s 49-Point Checklist™—which all our cleaning PROs use to guide their work—takes a thorough approach to busting household dust. On each clean, we task our PROs with addressing:

  • Baseboards
  • Windowsills
  • Floors
  • Lamps/lampshades
  • Picture frames
  • Ceiling fans
  • Upholstery
  • Furniture—tops, fronts, AND underneath!

What’s more, we train our PROs to clean in very specific ways to ensure that dust actually leaves a home with them rather than simply sending it flying all around only to resettle on surfaces after they leave.

But even if you regularly use PRO techniques and checklists for busting household dust, there are plenty of easily overlooked places that tend to trap and accumulate dust over time, demanding at least occasional attention for a truly fresh and clean home. Here’s an expanded dusting checklist for those big deep-cleaning days:

  • Blinds, window treatments, curtain rods, and brackets
  • Doorways
  • Decorative trims, lintels, mantels
  • Overhead and hanging light fixtures, sconces
  • Large and small appliances, TVs, computers, stereo equipment (especially underneath and behind)
  • Keyboards, clickers, phone keypads (dust with compressed gas, which can be purchased at most office supply stores)
  • Plants
  • Window screens/spaces between screens and glass
  • Wine racks/bottles
  • Bookshelves/books/magazines/CDs and other media
  • Candles
  • Baskets and other decorative receptacles
  • Insides of drawers and cabinets, plus food cans and jars
  • Behind toilet tanks
  • Smoke/carbon monoxide detectors and alarm sensors (which may stop functioning or even be set off accidentally by too much dust!)

If all that sounds just too daunting, ask your local MaidPro about what PRO deep-cleaning services they offer!

 

Summer Stain Guide

stain-guide

Summer is almost here! But, with more party, play, and free time comes more chances for little accidents that make household stains happen. Never fear! Simply bookmark this handy guide for treating common stains on carpets and furniture upholstery.

First, a few universal guides for treating ALL stains:

  • Before using any solutions, always test in an inconspicuous spot.
  • Start gentle and escalate slowly; repeat gentler steps several times, before moving to harsher methods that could discolor or otherwise damage stained surfaces.
  • Air dry completely between treatments as some stains only reappear when dry.
  • NEVER mix stain-fighting solutions, especially chlorine bleach with ammonia as it generates highly toxic fumes.
  • Avoid using high heat until you are sure a stain is gone completely, as this can set the stain forever.
  • When in doubt (or unsuccessful), call a PRO!

For most common stains, different solutions may be recommended depending on stain chemistry, but the same 4-step treatment method applies:

  1. Promptly blot away as much of the spill as possible using paper towels or clean white cloths. If a stain has dried, use a spoon or the back of a butter knife to scrape away as much as possible, starting at the edges and working inward. Then add a little cold water to re-moisten the stained area.
  2. Using solutions recommended below, alternately spritz, sponge, or dab onto the stain, then blot dry, using a clean white cloth or paper towel. Turn the cloth or towel with each blot until you can see no more of the stain transferring to the cloth.
  3. Allow to dry and repeat previous steps several times before moving on to harsher or store bought stain-removal solutions, which carry risks of doing damage.
  4. Once a stain is gone, thoroughly rinse away any solution residues and blot to dry.

Ketchup or mustard. Start with a solution of clear dishwashing liquid in lukewarm water. If stain persists and textile is light in color, try a weak solution of either hydrogen peroxide or ammonia in water, noting that both may have bleaching effects.

Popsicles and fruit-flavored drinks containing bright dyes. Start with a small quantity of clear dishwashing liquid in lukewarm water. If stain persists, use a powdered stain remover, per directions, then vacuum.

Wine. Start by pouring small amounts of club soda or cold water onto the stain and blotting. If stain persists and textile is light in color, try a few drops of diluted ammonia or a paste made from baking soda and water. If using a paste, gently scrape to loosen and vacuum after it dries.

Beer. Start with a solution of dishwashing soap and water. If that doesn’t work, try a weak solution of white vinegar and lukewarm water.

Blood. Start with a mild dishwashing liquid or non-alkaline detergent mixed with water. If bloodstain is dried or stubborn, try a small quantity of diluted ammonia or hydrogen peroxide, or, if bleaching is a concern, white vinegar.

Dusty, orange snack foods. Start with a mild dishwashing liquid mixed with water. If stain persists, a small amount of rubbing alcohol or diluted ammonia might do the trick.

Ice cream/chocolate (basically, any greasy/non-greasy combo stain). Blot as much away as possible with plain cold water, then use a diluted grease-busting dishwashing liquid or detergent containing enzymes.

Get Ready for Spring: A Room-by-Room Purge Guide

spring-purge

Spring is a time of rebirth! In preparation for your big spring cleaning ritual, now is the time to start sorting and discarding all the items that have collected in the last year. And there’s much more to it than just clothes closets and drawers. Here’s a handy room-by-room checklist of other things to focus on what to purge for spring:

Kitchen. From cabinets, pantry, refrigerator, and freezer, inspect and toss all foods that are past their sell- or use-by dates. If canned food is un-dated, decide based on: Is the packaging damaged or deteriorated in any way? Does the food appear discolored? Can you remember buying it? And, are you likely to ever consume it? For frozen foods, check this handy guide. When in doubt, throw it out!
Other things to purge in the kitchen include unmatched food storage containers and lids, chipped and cracked crockery, recipes and cookbooks you no longer use. Don’t forget to clean out the junk drawer too. Early spring is also a great time to replace water filters and to have cooking and carving knives professionally sharpened.

Bathroom. In addition to disposing (safely and securely) of expired over-the-counter and prescription medications, be sure to inspect and replace all aging cosmetics, toothbrushes, flossers, and so forth.

Family living areas. Look to purge broken toys and games and puzzles that are missing pieces. With spring-fair and yard-sale season coming, it’s also a great time to sort through and donate bulky media, such as books, magazines, CDs, DVDs, and video games. If you didn’t already do so with the change to daylight saving time, be sure to test and replace batteries in all smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

Laundry. Say goodbye to all those perpetually unmatched socks and dingy whites. Discard or fix garments with holes, missing buttons, broken zippers. While you’re at it, clear out accumulated lint in the vent that extends from your dryer to the outside (which is a big fire hazard). Cash in the coin hoard, and buy yourself a well-deserved treat.

Family closets and storage areas. Especially if you’ve got kids, there’s a good chance you have lots of outgrown (or unmatched) shoes, jackets, mittens, gloves, and other gear you can move along to free up space. It’s also a great time to take stock of all the spring and summer stuff you saved from last year—such as sporting equipment, flip flops, sunscreens, bug sprays, and so forth—to see what might need replacing.

Office/homework area. Once your tax returns are filed, many of the paper records you’ve been hanging onto can be safely shredded and recycled. Pick a rainy spring day to focus on cleaning up electronic devices—purging old emails, archiving files, downloading and organizing photos, and deleting those never-used apps.

15 spring-cleaning hacks for people who hate housework

Perfect for those who dread the annual deep clean, the money saving team at MaidPro have found the best tips for keeping your home neat and tidy without even breaking a sweat.

Forget expensive cleaning products and difficult organizing rituals, all of these tips are easy to achieve and won’t cost more than five pounds.

Some of the tips are unconventional, including pouring cola down the toilet but promise to have sparkling results.

The helpful pointers also include organizing tips such as keeping bed sets in a pillowcase and stacking clothes vertically not horizontally in drawers.

“These tips are great for those of us who hate cleaning as not only do they save time, they are cheaper alternatives to expensive cleaning products too.

“Saving time and money on cleaning leaves you feeling it’s a job well done and with more cash in your pocket too.”

1. Use a lemon to clean stainless steel

Annoying water stains on your tap and sink? Halve a lemon and use it to scrub stainless steel.

It will also make your kitchen smell fresh and citrusy.

Pour cola along the toilet bowl and flush for a sparkling result

2. Put a cup of vanilla extract in the oven

Sounds a bit crazy but by putting a few teaspoons of vanilla extract into a mug and baking for an hour, your whole home will smell gorgeous and inviting.

This is a trick estate agents swear by.

3. Steam clean microwave

Had a baked beans explosion? Clean your microwave the easy way by mixing two tablespoons of white vinegar and a few drops of your favorite essential oil with water and blast it for 5 minutes.

You’ll be left with a shiny clean microwave that smells amazing with zero scrubbing required.

4. Use cola to clean the toilet

You’ve probably heard about this one but never tried it, right?

It’s a miracle worker, just simply pour cola along the toilet bowl and flush for a sparkling result.

5. Use a cotton bud for cleaning keyboards

Instead of a wipe, take a damp cotton bud and use it to clean the difficult bits in between your keyboard.

6. Fold and stack clothes vertically not horizontally

Organise your t-shirt drawer by folding them and stacking vertically not horizontally.

This way you can flip through to find the one you want easily and minimize creasing which means less ironing, always good.

Use your dishwasher to clean children's toys

Use your dishwasher to clean children’s toys

7. Cover fridge shelves in cling film

Fridge spillages can be disastrous but easily cleaned up by simply covering the shelves with cling film or plastic wrap.

That way when something leaks or gets sticky, you can peel it off and start fresh, no cleaning necessary.

8. Microwave sponges

If you’ve only got one sponge to do all of the spring-cleaning with, disinfect it quickly and easily by putting it in your now spotless microwave for two minutes.

Just make sure your sponge doesn’t have any metal on it.

9. Store sheet sets in pillow cases

Finding matching bed sets can be a huge time waster but solved easily by organizing your linen.

Fold matching bed sets into the corresponding pillowcase so they are all kept together.

10. Stop your bin smelling of rubbish

Even after a bin is emptied, often a nasty lingering smell can remain.

To avoid this, sprinkle some baking soda or vinegar into the bottom of the bin to reduce the odor and lay down some clean newspaper to absorb any leftover moisture.

11. Clean toys in dishwasher

If your mucky pups’ toys are looking a bit worse for wear stick them in the dishwasher for a short cycle.

12. Make your bathroom smell constantly fresh

Add a few drops of essential oil to the inside of your toilet paper roll to keep your bathroom smelling lovely.

13. Refresh plastic containers

Get the leftover curry stains out of plastic containers by putting a solution of washing up liquid, bleach and water in them and microwaving until boiling point.

Once cooled, pour away and rinse.

14. Deep clean shower head

After having a shower, fill a sandwich bag with baking soda and vinegar and tie it around the showerhead using an elastic band.

Leave this to soak overnight then any debris will come off easily with an old toothbrush.

15. Use pastry brush to get crumbs out of toaster

Toast crumbs are notoriously difficult to get to but using a pastry brush can help sweep away the annoying trapped bits.

Six Unexpected Benefits of Green Cleaning

green-clean-benefits

If you’re looking to do more to protect the environment, switching to a greener way of cleaning is an excellent place to start.

We’re so serious about green cleaning here at MaidPro that we’ve dedicated a big section of our website to educating people about what it really means to clean green and how to choose solutions and tools that are simultaneously safe, environmentally friendly, and effective.

Aside from the satisfaction that comes with knowing you’re doing something tangible to protect the environment, there are other — often unexpected — benefits of going green when you clean. Here are six:

It’s really clean. If you take time to educate yourself and approach green cleaning correctly, you’ll end up with a home that is truly clean — versus one that simply looks and smells clean. Truly clean homes, in turn, look and smell clean for much longer than just a day or two.

Less stress about children and pets. Well-formulated green cleaning products contain fewer harsh chemicals and are less likely to generate dangerous fumes and chemical residues. That makes them safer for you, your kids, and your fur babies too.

More help. Because green cleaning is safer for kids, you can involve them more in helping you clean. Not only does it reduce your cleaning burden, it teaches kids important life values and skills.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T. If you hadn’t noticed, kids from preschool through college spend a great deal of time learning about environmental protection. They really care about the environment. When you demonstrate —  by action — that you care just as much, you earn their respect (which is a great thing especially if you have preteens and teenagers).

Less expensive (when you do it right). As we detail on our website, green cleaning is about much more than simply buying cleaners that are labeled green. It’s also about choosing products in concentrated forms that use less/recyclable packaging and cost less to transport and reusable (versus disposable) tools, such as washable rags. These choices generally save you money over time.

Sparks creativity. Once you get going with a green cleaning mindset — and thinking about all the ways you might apply to specific cleaning jobs   such as post-holiday or big-party cleanup —  it has a way of leading you into all sort of fun, creative activities, new personal interactions, and other changes that simply improve your quality of life.

 

7 Ideas for a Happy, Healthy Valentine’s Day

MaidPro Nj/DE

This year for Valentine’s Day, instead of focusing on heart-shaped things and material symbols of love, why not plan a day that makes your heart truly sing? Make it all about nurturing the physical, emotional, and spiritual health of your own heart, the ones you love, and even the hearts of pets and people you don’t know. The great thing about such an approach to Valentine’s is that it matters not if you are partnered, single, surrounded by friends and family, or feeling alone in the world just now. Here are a few ideas for making this February 14 a happy, healthy Valentine’s Day:

Renew vows for healthier, happier living. Perhaps you made a New Year’s resolution—to quit unhealthy habits, lose weight, exercise more, eat less sugar and refined carbs—that you have already let go. It’s never too late to get back on track, so make February 14 the day you forgive yourself for transgressions and renew the vows you made to honor and care for own physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being.

Cook at home. One of the heart-healthiest things you can do for yourself and your family is to cook real foods from scratch at home where you control menu choices, ingredients, flavors, and portion sizes. If you’re not the greatest cook or need to lighten up your repertoire, make a Valentine’s date for yourself—and maybe a mate—for a heart-healthy cooking class. If you’re already handy in the kitchen, spend quality time with loved ones finding and experimenting with new heart-healthy recipes and finding different ways to add flavor to food with healthy spices and seasonings rather than excess fats and sodium.

Get active. Research shows that a moderate-intensity walk or hike can yield the same heart-healthy benefits as high-intensity running. It’s also a great way to escape distracting devices, chores, and other cares, and share quality time and conversation with the ones you love. If it’s too cold to go outside, find ways to get active inside: climbing stairs, dancing, or practicing yoga with an app or online video.

Go outside. Wintertime depression is closely tied to a lack of Vitamin D, which your body manufactures from exposure to natural sunlight. If your winter climate is cold, you might be especially susceptible to the February blues. Hiking, sledding, skating, skiing, and even ice fishing are all great ways to get outside, boost vitamin D stores, and tend to your heart happiness on Valentine’s Day.

Give compliments. How often have you thought of nice things to say to people, but, for some reason, just never said them? Resolve to spend Valentine’s Day looking for reasons to appreciate people in your life and then following through and verbalizing the compliments—or, if you are really shy, writing them. While you are at it, be sure to find a few compliments for yourself.

Do anonymous acts of kindness. While, for many, Valentine’s means grand romance, it can be a hugely painful day for anyone suffering loss, grief, or loneliness. The act of making others happy—without taking credit—always rebounds to the giver, so resolve to spend at least part of your Valentine’s Day doing random, anonymous acts of kindness for those who really need it.

Practice gratitude. One of the best ways to relieve stress, to make your heart sing, and improve heart health is to spend a few moments of each day in a state of pure appreciation and gratitude for all you have—be it your partner, family, friends, acquaintances, knowledge, talent, passions, possessions, and life itself. If you don’t do this regularly already, let Valentine’s be the day you start a new habit of daily gratitude and appreciation.