Smell Great and Keep the Bugs Away All Summer Long

maidpro

There are plenty of good reasons to start making your own (DIY) natural insect repellents (DEET-free and smelling good are two examples). Hundreds of DIY bug spray, candle, and balm recipes are just a quick Google or Pinterest search away. With the right ingredients on hand, you can whip up a fresh batch in just a few minutes and save money doing it. Before buying any ingredients, making, or using DIY bug repellent, though, consider these four important caveats:

  1. It’s a wild west out there. A surprising number of DIY beauty and skincare recipes contain potentially harmful ingredients (or concentrations thereof)—even when those ingredients seem perfectly innocuous. With DIY insect repellents, watch out for their use of essential oils. Not all essential oils are recommended for direct use on skin, especially with children or in high concentrations. Make sure to research usage recommendations and cautions for every ingredient on the list.
  2. Ingredient quality matters. If using essential oils for the first time, there is also a great deal you need to learn about oil quality and purity. Where DIY insectifuge is concerned, there seems to be a consensus that greater oil purity equates to greater efficacy at repelling bugs, but there are still many conflicting opinions and plenty of misleading marketing language. That said, you’ll need to make your own judgement call about what brand to trust.
  3. If at first you don’t succeed, try other recipes! A DIY bug spray that works well for you might be 0% effective for a different person. Plenty of rigorous scientific studies prove that bugs are simply more attracted to some people over others. You might need to try an array of different DIY bug spray concoctions before hitting on a formula that works well for you and other members of your family.
  4. Some risks need to trump others. No bug spray—commercial or DIY—can be 100% effective at protecting against mosquito- and tick-borne illnesses. Physicians overwhelmingly recommend DEET-based varieties when knowingly going into areas where such diseases are most common.If you’re just one of those people for whom nothing—not even the DEET bug spray varieties—seems to work, you might resort toother natural methods of repelling bugs, sitting in a screened area, or simply heading inside when the bugs come out to feed at night!

9 Micro Actions That Make Your Home Greener AND Save You Money

MaidPro NJ

There are plenty of big, expensive projects you can undertake to make your home greener, such as insulating, adding water filtration, and retrofitting with energy-efficient heating/cooling systems and appliances. Here are 9 much less daunting things you can start any time—most of which will help you to save up for those bigger green home improvement projects.

  1. Don’t just turn off lights, appliances, and electronics, unplug them when not in use. That goes for all chargers, too, which continue to draw power any time they are plugged in. The drain from a single device or appliance might not seem too great, but when you multiply it across all the plug-in-able items in your home, you might be looking at hundreds of dollars in savings.
  2. Say “No!” to over-packaged and disposable consumer goods. Five easy swaps guaranteed to save you money are: concentrated for un-concentrated detergents; bar soap for body washes; refillable for disposable razors; cotton dish towels for paper towels; and linen for disposable napkins. The latter three have an added benefit of making your home more luxurious too.
  3. Keep oven and refrigerator doors closed when operating. Estimates vary but at least one says you can lose up to 150-degrees in just 30 seconds. Not only does it waste energy, it extends cooking time and contributes to poor results, such as dried-out meat or underdeveloped flavors.
  4. Check out your local farmers’ market. Okay, this one might be a little more expensive, but locally raised produce and meats have far lower environmental impacts and are generally more nutritious than those shipped from distant lands and stored for extended periods.
  5. Cut food waste by: shopping more frequently, checking to see what you have in stock before shopping, searching for recipes that use what you already have, and composting food scraps. By at least one estimate, a family of four can save more than $2K in a year.
  6. Get educated on how to minimize VOC air concentrations. A big part of living green is focusing on creating a healthy home environment for your family. Since it’s virtually impossible to avoid or remove all VOCs from the air, try cultivating some air-cleaning houseplants.
  7. Plant your yard and garden with native plants that thrive in local climate conditions. The reason: Native plants are already well adapted to the characteristics and typical variations in your climate (including, dry spells and heat waves, for example). This means they don’t need as much extra watering, feeding, and fertilizing as non-native plants do. They also support native ecosystems of birds, bees, insects, and other wildlife.
  8. Fix leaky faucets and toilets, which might be literally pouring money down the drain. According toisustainableearch.com, a leaky toilet can run you nearly $1K per year and can be very difficult to detect. If your water bill is high compared to your neighbors, check with your local DPW to see if they can help or provide a dye kit to help diagnose.
  9. Lower your thermostat by a few degrees (in winter). Turns out that, in addition to conserving energy and saving money, keeping even a slightly colder house can have plenty of other benefits, includingprolonging plants’ lives, boosting metabolism for weight loss, and sleeping better.

Summer Home Prep: Outdoor Fun

MaidPro Summer Fun

We’ve already focused on getting the inside of your home ready for a cool, carefree season, but summer is about enjoying the sun and those warm, breezy nights! Here is a checklist of ideas for creating memorable outdoor living and entertaining experiences all summer long:

Start with repair work. Inspect for and fix any winter wear and tear that could pose hazards of physical injury, such as splintering or rotting wood, loose or raised nails, cracks in cement, broken flagstones, and so forth. While you’re at it, inspect for—and be sure to clean out and seal—any places that might make ideal nesting spots for wasps, hornets, or other stinging pests.

Get out the hose. Take advantage of lingering cooler days or early evenings for the more physically demanding work of sweeping, pulling weeds, and hosing down, scrubbing, or power-washing patios, decks, balconies, and outdoor furniture. If power-washing, be super careful to read and heed all safety instructions.

Freshen the furniture. Especially if patio furniture winters outside, inspect carefully for signs of rust, rot, structural weakness, loose nails and screws, and address accordingly. Consider re-painting, re-staining, and/or treating for future resistance to rust. Check and treat all cushions, pillows, umbrellas, and other textiles for mold and mildew.

Gear up your grilling game. If you have a gas grill, now is the time to fill propane tanks, clean, and inspect all gas lines and connections, and clean or replace lava stones. There two basic schools of thought on how to best clean grill grates, which we covered in this post a few years back.

Decorate! The most enjoyable outdoor summer spaces borrow ideas from home decorating. For example, there is a whole world of amazing ideas just for decorating fences and outer walls. For inspiration with plants and flower pots, check out Southern Living’s 121 container gardening ideas. Consider also using containers to grow fresh veggies and herbs that you can harvest literally when our cooking on your grill. Talk about fresh!

When it comes to placing flowering plants in or around patios, decks, and balconies, do some research first into what blooms and scents are most attractive to biting bugs and stinging creatures such as bees as well as to more welcome visitors such as butterflies and humming birds.

Bear in mind as you decorate that mosquitoes breed rapidly in standing water, so, at all costs, avoid placing open containers that will collect rainwater. Other fun and practical elements to consider when decorating outdoor spaces for summer include: strings of white or colorful twinkling lights; paper lanterns; kerosene or solar-powered torches; a heating element such as a fire pit, propane heater, or chiminea for chilly nights; and lots of colorful pillows, cushions and even a blanket throw or two for max lounging comfort.

Summer Home Prep: Indoor Comfort

MaidPro NJ

The unofficial start to summer is here! With it can come lots of hot, humid weather. To keep your body as cool as possible—and conserve energy while you’re at it—brush up on these tips for beating summer’s heat. Meanwhile, here’s a checklist of cleaning tasks to prepare your home for a most comfortable and pleasant summer:

Clean and/or replace home ventilation and air conditioning filters. If you’ve not done so at least once in the past year or two, it’s also a great time to bring in a pro service to inspect and clean all central HVAC equipment, ducts, vents, and air filters.

Inspect for and address any signs of mold and mildew growth, which summer’s humidity will be sure to feed.

Clean ceiling and portable fans. Note that most portable fans can be easily disassembled, enabling accumulated dust and grim to be washed from blades and grills. If you don’t have the proper tools—such as an extender pole – for cleaning ceiling fans safely, recruit at least one person to spot you on a ladder. Since you’ll have the ladder out anyway, remove and clean lighting fixture covers, recessed fixtures, and bulbs too to brighten up your space.

Wash windows and clear away dead bugs and other debris that might have collected inside window casings over the winter and spring.

Clean and inspect screens; patch holes. If you have an outdoor water source, window screens can be cleaned quickly and thoroughly with just a hose and sturdy rag to wipe away accumulated dirt and grime. Dry in the sun before installing.

Clean blinds, curtains, window shades, and valances. Keeping blinds and curtains closed is a great way to keep your home cool and save on energy costs if you air condition. Since you’ll be seeing much more of them soon, it’s a great time to clean all window treatments and consider lightening up on fabrics and colors.

Lighten the bedding. Think cotton in airy colors such as pure whites and pastels. While you’re at it, flip, rotate, and vacuum mattresses (which should be done at least twice a year) and dust thoroughly in and around beds to remove accumulated pollen and other spring detritus.

Deep clean your fridge and defrost the freezer to maximize space for lots of fresh, light foods; stock your pantry with essentials for making salads, grilled specialties, and other cooling summer fare.

Finally, if you expect to keep your windows mostly closed for A/C, consider freshening indoor air with a few new air-cleaning plants.

In our next post, we’ll look at summer prep for patios, balconies, and other outdoor living spaces, so stay tuned!

Cleaning Myths Debunked: Mold & Mildew

maidpro NJ

Uncontrolled growth of mold in your home can be a scary, dangerous, and expensive thing. But, knowing a few important facts about mold can help you to address the risks and keep your home healthy for a lifetime. Here are five big mold myths debunked:


Myth: Mold & mildew are the same thing.

Mildew is powdery or downy white, yellow, or brown-colored fungus that grows in a flat pattern on surfaces and can be scrubbed off easily with a spray cleaner and brush. Mold is a fuzzy, aggressively growing fungus that creates difficult-to- kill spore clusters that behave like roots and grow deep into porous surfaces such as drywall, tile grout, and wood. Mold can be blue, green, yellow, brown, gray, black, or white. In bathrooms, mold roots can travel all the way through grout, behind tiles, and into walls and house framing. Mold consumes and destroys surfaces and, depending on the variety, may also cause health problems, including sinus infections, headaches, allergies, inflamed respiratory airways, and more.


Myth: Bleach kills 100% of mold and mildew.

Bleach only kills mold and mildew on tops of surfaces. The chemical structure of bleach disallows its absorption into porous surfaces, no matter how much you apply, even when undiluted. The surface top may look clean and white, but just a few millimeters underneath the mold is still alive and will start re-growing within minutes.


Myth: Once a surface looks clean and white, all mold has been removed.

Bleach requires a full five-minute soak time with at least three-quarters of a cup of bleach per gallon of water to kill surface mold spores. The problem is that bleach makes mold look white before it dies, so people often rinse bleach away before it has killed any mold at all. Worse yet, the water in your bleach solution soaks into porous surfaces and feeds the deep mold you are trying to kill. Unchecked, the mold grows deeper into walls and studs until structural damage and health impacts become so bad the problem can no longer be ignored.


Myth: If grout looks good after cleaning with bleach, it was just mildew.

This is a dangerous half truth and a big reason why so many home owners let mold damage get out of control in their bathrooms. There is a simple test: if you can scrub stains off easily with a bleach-free bathroom cleaner, it’s probably just mildew. If you use a bleach-based cleaner and the stains return after a few days in roughly the same spots, you’ve likely got mold growing beneath the surface.


Myth: Once mold is dead, the problem is solved.

This is, by far, the falsest claim of all. It is impossible to keep new mold spores from entering your home as it can grow anywhere it finds food—decaying matter such as fallen leaves, garbage, or trash—and moisture—which can be anything from leaky pipes to air humidity—in temperatures ranging from 32-120°F. Even mold on food in your freezer doesn’t die; it merely goes dormant until it warms up! If you can survive in an environment, so too can mold. What is more, there are varieties of mold spores that are just as toxic and allergy-inducing when dead as when they are alive and growing.


Myth: Homeowners can easily solve mold problems on their own.

The only way to truly solve a mold problem is by removing infected materials and the sources of moisture that started the problem. Controlling indoor air humidity, repairing leaky pipes and shower walls, resealing and replacing porous grout, caulking, and more are all parts of the solution. Most mold sprays are simply fancy-marketed bleach sprays that remove mold stains, but do nothing to address root problems. As a rule of thumb, if you have a mold-affected area larger than 10 square feet, immediately seek the help of a professional mold-abatement service.

Spring Cleaning Tips: Tackling the Bathroom

maidpro bathroom

Every room in your home needs a deeper-than-usual clean and refresh at least once or twice a year. With its fresh air and tone of rebirth and renewal, there is no time like spring for finding the inspiration to get it all done. Here are five tips for tackling the bathroom this spring:

Get into the nooks and crannies. Bathrooms have plenty of tiny, inconvenient-to-clean spaces that you might pass over on regular daily or weekly cleanings. For example, when is the last time you dusted out the narrow space between your toilet tank and the wall? Or, the last time you cleaned just under and around the lid of the tank? Both are great spaces for mildew and other germs to hang out and multiply. Other oft neglected spots include around the bases of faucets and fixtures where soap scum and grit builds up and hardens, often requiring scraping for a true clean. While you’re at it, take a good look at your grout, which can usually be brightened up with the right cleaner, a small sturdy brush, and a bit of elbow grease.

Inspect and discard all expired stuff. If you have unused prescription meds, bring them to your pharmacy for proper disposal or find out if your city or town offers a drug take-back program. Expired OTC meds can go right into the trash. Be sure to inspect all lotions, creams, and makeup items too, as many have surprisingly short shelf lives. Toothbrushes should be replaced about once every three months and be sure to store new ones in an upright position to enable complete air drying between uses, experts say.

Purge the excess. As bathrooms tend to have limited space, give careful consideration to everything you store there. Is there a curling wand that gets used only 2-3 times a year taking up precious real estate? Are there five hair brushes, where one might do? Are you storing large refill containers of shampoos and conditioners bought at wholesale clubs? Remove rarely-used items to a different location, such as a linen closet. The less you keep in your bathroom, the more functional it becomes and the easier it will be to keep clean and tidy all week long.

Do make room for critical supplies. No one wants to be the person using a bathroom when it runs out of toilet paper, hand soap, or towels. Nice baskets filled with unwrapped toilet paper rolls and a soap display add decorative elements to your bathroom, while also making family members and guests feel most comfortable. Pre-moistened wipes or a spray bottle and clean rag near to hand make it easy for you and family members to wipe up toothpaste gobs, stray hairs, and other small daily messes. If you ever entertain overnight guests, extra new toothbrushes are great extra items to keep on hand as well.

Get organized. If your bathroom often resembles a jumble sale, it might be worth investing in a few elegant, yet simple and inexpensive organizing solutions. Think wooden drawer organizers, canvas totes, shower caddies,and the like.

Refresh your look. Your bathroom is one of the easiest and least expensive rooms to completely re-style with a new look or color scheme, especially if floors, counters, and tile are white or neutral in tone. Consider changing up your shower curtain, bath mat, or towels and ‘shopping at home’ for things you might repurpose to add style and keep your bathroom organized. A china sugar bowl, for example, makes a great decorative container for cotton balls or tooth-floss picks, while a shallow serving tray can be a great way to corral lots of small items you want near to hand such as lotions, creams, and perfume bottles. There are also hundreds of chic, decorative paper designs available at low costs for lining shelves and adding visual pop to the insides of bathroom cabinets and drawers.

 

Spring Cleaning Tips: Turning over Closets

maispro-springclean

With spring busting out all over, the last thing you might want to be doing is turning over your wardrobe from winter to spring/summer. Use these eight steps to get the job done fast yet effectively:

Purge, purge, purge. Start by taking everything out and inspecting each item as you do. Haven’t worn it at least once or twice in the past season? Is it getting a little shabby? Does it fail to fit well and flatter your figure? Is it cheap, trendy, and unlikely to be in-style next season? If you answer yes to any of the above, consider donating or tossing.

Physically clean storage spaces. Thoroughly vacuum closets and drawers; dust and be prepared to re-line shelves and drawers if needed. While you’re at it, discard broken and bent hangers, empty dry-cleaning bags, shoe boxes, retail tags, and any other detritus that might have collected in clothing storage spaces over the past season.

Launder or dry clean all garments before storing. Even if it looks and smells clean, if it has been worn, you can be sure it’s harboring some form of human dander that will become food for dust mites, mold, and mildew.

Choose plastic. Cardboard and corrugated boxes are prone to bugginess and may also absorb moisture and odors. Invest in sturdy plastic containers that seal well as these will last virtually a lifetime. Protect wools with cedar chips or planks, but be aware that cedar may stain certain fabrics, so wrap accordingly.

Package with care. Fold neatly, wrapping delicate items in tissue paper, and stuffing boots and handbags to ensure they hold their shape and come out of storage ready to wear next year.

Pack with your next seasonal turnover in mind. For example, group heavier sweaters, winter outerwear, and so forth and place into the least accessible locations. Next, group long-sleeved shirts, lighter sweaters and slacks, and any other transitional clothing to be easily accessible and ready to pull out either for unseasonable or transitional weather days.

If possible, choose dark, dry places to store your containers. Even clothing packed in tightly-sealed plastic can take on permanent musty odors if stored in humid spaces such as basements. For high-value items, consider storing professionally; many dry cleaners will store for free or at very low cost.

Use the turnover of seasons as an opportunity to rethink how you organize your wardrobe. By color? Type of garment? Whole outfits? What has not worked well in the past? Might there be a different system that better suits your personality and lifestyle? While you’re at it, check out different folding techniques that can help you to better optimize your use of space, make it easier to put away laundry, and to see everything you have available when you are trying to to put together that perfect outfit.

The Big Key to Pet-Friendly Cleaning: Rinse Like a PRO

 

Pet Friendly Cleaning

When it comes to pets, house cleaning poses a serious conundrum.

On the one hand, families with pets need to clean more often and with greater rigor. Beyond all the shedding, fur, and dander, pets track in dirt and mud, their paws and claws can harbor pathogens, and sometimes they roll deliberately in yucky things you definitely don’t want on your furniture, floors, and other household surfaces.

On the other hand, harsh cleaning chemicals can be especially toxic to pets. Compared to their humans, household pets typically have faster metabolisms, smaller lungs, are into sniffing and licking things, and simply lack a consciousness of dangers they wouldn’t normally encounter in the wild.

Google the phrase ‘pet-friendly cleaning’ and you’ll find plenty of advice for do-it-yourself (DIY) cleaning solutions often revolving around such ingredients as vinegar, lemon juice, and baking soda. A big problem is that many such solutions create only an appearance of clean, meaning they don’t properly disinfect (kill germs) or actually remove dirt and grime that builds up and damages your floors and household surfaces over time. What’s more, to create a fragrance of clean, many DIY recipes rely on essential oils, which pets can’t always metabolize, meaning they can build up rapidly to toxic levels, even causing organ failure.

So, how to ensure both a clean home and healthy pets?

Many articles on pet-friendly cleaning simply advise one to choose solutions that are scent-free, biodegradable, and/or derived exclusively from plants. That’s great starting advice, but we’d take it a few steps further. The key to choosing well is to understand that well-designed household cleaners are chemically engineered to bind with and suspend dirt and oils in water and to be rinsed away completely, leaving minimal residues. Cheap or poorly engineered cleaners (even if they claim to be green or pet-friendly), mops, cloths, and sponges with poor absorbency, and nonprofessional cleaning techniques pose the greatest threats to pets because they can cause toxic residues to be left behind on surfaces.

In choosing cleaning solutions, be sure to look past the pet-friendly labeling to the actual science that ensures a solution is designed chemically to clean effectively and to rinse away completely.

A thorough process for rinsing—something our own cleaning PROs are taught in their training—is one of the best ways to ensure home safety and protection from cleaning chemicals for pets and humans. Be sure to read and follow to the letter any usage instructions accompanying pet-friendly cleaners and use PRO tools and techniques for making sure your surfaces are simultaneously clean and free of chemical residues.

Here at MaidPro, our PROs always arrive equipped with solutions and tools that we have selected carefully for the balance they offer between safety and effectiveness. However, our PROs are always happy to use any alternative cleaning products that our clients leave out with instruction.

MaidPro’s Spring Cleaning Roadmap

Spring Cleaning

First step: Get your head in the game. The good news about spring cleaning is that it’s usually inspired by a combination of three things: stir craziness from being inside for much of the winter, that whole ‘new-growth’ feeling that spring brings, plus a desire to get a bunch of needed tasks out of the way before the high heat – and big fun – of summer come rolling along. You can add to the feeling of inspiration by focusing on the facts that: annual deep cleaning protects the value of your home and health of your family, is a great way to burn extra calories in advance of bathing-suit season, and yields a crisp palette for freshening up your home décor.

What to clean

  • Anything involving textiles – think curtains, drapes, rugs, carpets, bedding, mattresses, pillows, and furniture upholstery – which play host to tons of human and pet dander, dust and dust mites. When possible, expose textiles to fresh air, sunlight and wind.
  • Inside, under and behind all furniture and major appliances, including your refrigerator, oven, dishwasher (decalcify), washing machine (sanitize by running empty with super hot water and plenty of bleach) and clothes-dryer (clean lint venting system thoroughly to remove fire hazard).
  • Clean or replace filters on air conditioning units, water taps and/or inside refrigerators that dispense water and ice.
  • Closets, drawers, kitchen and bathroom cabinets – remove everything; purge unwanted and expired items; clean drawers, floors and shelves before replacing items.
  • Long-term storage areas – basement, attic, garage (take advantage of the numerous donation opportunities that arise in spring).
  • Windows – inside and out.
  • Floors – deep clean and protect or wax (if needed).
  • If you have young kids, spring is also the best time to clean and sanitize their toys.

Whew! That’s a long list, but with good planning and preparation, it can be managed quite easily.

Sequencing your spring clean

Start by making a list of the tasks you know you will never tackle yourself. Schedule appointments with contractors and service providers – for example, carpet and upholstery cleaners, gutter cleaners, landscapers – early before their schedules fill up. Tip: Schedule some of your own big cleaning jobs to coincide with times you know you will be home to host various cleaning contractors.

Purge. Purge. Purge. It’s a lot easier to clean when you’re not inundated with stuff. Figure out ahead of time when opportunities will arise for you to donate unwanted items. Collect boxes and make sure your junk is packed, labeled and ready to go well in advance of donation dates.
Unless you live in a climate that is warm year round, start with less-intensive inside cleaning jobs – closets, drawers, cabinets – that do not require extra ventilation for cleaning solutions.
Schedule the remaining fresh-air-and-sunshine jobs for those first blissful – throw-open-your-windows -weeks of real spring weather. Plan to work in half-day segments so you don’t squander all the good weather on cleaning. And set manageable goals for what you will accomplish in each segment so you don’t fall into the common trap of enthusiastically ripping everything apart, then running out of time or energy before you can get it put back together. Pay particular attention to long-term weather forecasts so you can match tasks to expected conditions. For example, warm, sunny and windy days are perfect for quickly drying damp upholstery, heavy bedding and area rugs outside.

Recruit a help crew

Unless you crave solitude after a winter spent cooped up inside with your family, be sure to enlist plenty of help for big spring cleaning jobs. Adult partners and teenagers should be recruited to haul junk, add extra elbow grease to extra grimy areas and push around larger pieces of furniture and moveable appliances. Younger children can be put to work with organizing and sorting (for example, re-uniting their game pieces, boards, cards, dice, etc.) and moving around lighter items such as pillows, curtains and bedding.
Make a detailed spring-cleaning plan and stick to it using the following MaidPro Spring Cleaning Survival Guide. Come summer you will be absolutely delighted that you did.

Shake Off Those Winter Blahs!

winter blues MaidPro

If you feel unusually tired, unmotivated to go out and exercise, or find you have developed an affinity for binge-watching TV and comfort foods, you might be suffering from a case of winter blues. Here are seven quick ideas to get you out of winter hibernation mode and ready for spring—which, according to Punxsutawney Phil, is right around the corner!

Stop blaming yourself. The shorter days of winter have been altering your circadian rhythms and the complex hormones that regulate sleep, hunger, and feelings of well-being. According to Psych Central, the best way to reset your internal body clock is to allow yourself to wake naturally (versus setting an alarm) at least on weekends and to get at least 20 minutes each day with some skin exposed to direct sunlight. That doesn’t have to be outside. On super cold days, try taking a long drive, sitting near a window, or joining your wise pet for a nap in the sunny spot on the floor.

Buddy up! Ask a person whose company you really enjoy to join you for a daily exercise routine. The social aspect will energize you, and on the days you really don’t feel doing it, your buddy can motivate you and vice versa.

Check your gear. If you shy away from exercising outside in winter, check the quality of your outdoor gear. You’ll be more likely to head outside if you’re confident you’ll be warm and dry the entire time. Is your attire warm enough for all temps? Does it allow for delayering as your body temp rises? Is it designed to wick away perspiration? Does it help you to feel safe from hazards such as snow or ice underfoot and passing vehicles? Having the the gear attire handy for all weathers is a great motivator.

Dress upon waking. When you sit around all morning in comfy slippers and jammies drinking coffee or tea, it’s much harder to persuade yourself to get up and go. Dress for exercise as soon as you rise in the morning and you’ll be far more likely to actually walk out the door.

Discover new winter activities. Skating, skiing, sledding—all are great fun, but have you ever tried snow shoeing? Ice fishing? Maple sugaring? Curling? Winter bird watching or amateur photography? Building a snowman or starting a snowball fight are other great ways to get your heart pumping while you soak up some sunshine in late winter months.

Focus on signs that spring is coming. Maybe it’s a web site that shows day lengths growing by two-and-half minutes each day, browsing seed catalogs for your garden, tuning into the drip, drip of icicles melting, or the gradual return of morning birdsong. Focus on the positive and your mind-body-spirit is bound to follow.

Plan a summer vacation. Maybe it’s a week at the beach, a series of fun day trips, or even a productive stay-cation where you take on a strenuous home project you’ve been meaning to get to for a while. The point is to give yourself something to look forward to and/or something to work toward in terms of optimizing your health and physical fitness.